Class Winners Emerge

On the fourth day of the RORC Caribbean 600, Thursday 22 February, class winners were decided for IRC Zero in the early hours, the Class40 division in the afternoon, and just before midnight the IRC One champions crossed the finish line.

IRC Zero

Niklas Zennström’s Carkeek 52 Rán (SWE) won a highly contested battle in the hi-tech class. Peter & David Askew’s Botin 52 Wizard (USA) was second by just three minutes and 10 seconds after IRC time correction. Third was Frederic Puzin’s Ker 46 Daguet 3 (FRA), just seven minutes after IRC time correction ahead of Jon Desmond’s Mills 41 Final Final (USA).

Niklas Zennström was delighted with the class win; tinged with a little frustration at just missing out on the overall win to Leopard 3 by under two hours after IRC time correction. “We did as much as we could; we sailed a really good race and Steve (Hayles) and Bouwe (Bekking) made very good calls. The end was a bit of an odd feeling. It was pitch black at Redonda with a big cloud overhead that we could not avoid. We lost all speed and watched Wizard close the gap unaffected, so hanging on to beat them was a bit of a relief.”

Niklas Zennström’s Team on his Carkeek 52 Rán (SWE) © William Simpson

“Once you step ashore and think about it, you ask yourself; did we sail as good as we could? Did we make any stupid mistakes? The answer is that we sailed well, but sometimes you are on the wrong side of a cloud and sometimes not; that is part of the sport. Did we have a good time? Absolutely, you have to play your strategy well and as far as luck goes, eventually that will even out.

“What we are always looking for in any race is to have really great competition, particularly boats of similar size and speed, and we had that with the Nelson’s Cup and the ‘600. The boat has been very reliable and we have raced well as a team, so this has been a great project for the Nelson’s Cup and RORC Caribbean 600 Race. If we could race again tomorrow, we probably would, that is how good this race is,” concluded Zennström.

Rán (SWE) at St Barths © Tim Wright/Photoaction.com

Peter & David Askew’s Botin 52 Wizard and Rán at the start © Alex Turnbull

Frederic Puzin’s Ker 46 Daguet 3 (FRA) © Tim Wright/Photoaction.com

Class40

Sogestran Seafrigo LHOR One (FRA), skippered by Guillaume Pirouelle won a nail-biting thriller. Melwin Fink’s Sign for Com (GER) was second and third was James McHugh’s Tquila (GBR).

A fierce battle for supremacy came to a conclusion after three days and nights of boat-on-boat combat around 11 Caribbean islands. James McHugh’s Manuard Mach 4 Tquila took the early lead against boats with over four years of additional design development. LHOR One, a 2023 Manuard Mach 5 showed great speed on the reach up to Barbuda after the start, as did Mathieu Jones’ Manuard Mach 5 Alternative Sailing – Constructions du Belon.

Tquila held off the pack to be first to round Nevis and Saba. A tactical leg on the wind to St Barths saw Tquila and LHOR One break away from the pack, with Tquila just hanging on to pole position all the way to the Anguilla Channel. On approach to Tintamarre, LHOR One stayed further south and got into the lead and extended on the long leg to Guadeloupe.

As the wind shadow of Guadeloupe came into play, LHOR One chose to stay offshore. Tquila went all the way in and passed LHOR One. The chasing pack, still in the breeze, closed in on the leaders. On the leg to Barbuda for the second rounding, Tquila chose to stay inshore rather than the competition which went as far as 15 miles offshore looking for breeze. Tquila won that strategic battle in spades, opening up a lead of four miles.

Sogestran Seafrigo LHOR One (FRA), skippered by Guillaume Pirouelle © Tim Wright/Photoaction.com

By Redonda, Tquila was leading LHOR One by over half an hour. Jules Bonnier’s Manuard Mach 3 Nestenn – Entrepreneurs pour la Planète was up to third, but nearly an hour behind Tquila. The stage was set for a shifty light airs final leg to the finish. Approaching Antigua, Tquila threw the dice; after leading the pack south of the rhumb line, Tquila went north and the chasing boats chose the shortest route to the finish. Melwin Fink’s 2022 Verdier Sign for Com (GER) got into the showdown, but Tquila’s move north did not pay off.

There was a final twist to the thrilling Class40 battle; Nestenn crossed the line first but was penalised for entering an exclusion zone at Montserrat. Second over the line and Class40 victory went to Sogestran Seafrigo LHOR One, with Sign for Com second and Tquila third.

James McHugh’s Tquila (GBR) © Tim Wright/Photoaction.com

Melwin Fink’s Sign for Com (GER) © Tim Wright/Photoaction.com

Jules Bonnier’s Manuard Mach 3 Nestenn – Entrepreneurs pour la Planète © Tim Wright/Photoaction.com

Sogestran Seafrigo LHOR One (FRA) Team – Pierrick Letouzé Valentin Sipan, Alexis Loison, Guillaume Pirouelle © Arthur Daniel/RORC

“We are all from Normandy in France and very proud to have won this great race,” commented LHOR One’s skipper Guillaume Pirouelle. “This project is designed to give experience to Class40 sailors from Normandy and all of the crew come from either Cherbourg or Le Havre. This has been a very hard race on the mind. The course is fantastic with so many options which allows for many gains and losses throughout.”

Rolex Fastnet winner Alexis Loison has competed in the race before but this was his first in a Class40. “The course tests the boats and crew at every wind angle, which is a great way to get a lot of knowledge about the boat and how to achieve the manoeuvres,” commented Loison. “I think that this race and the Caribbean season in general is a great place to base a Class40 programme because you have great sailing conditions literally guaranteed for may months.”

Richard Fromentin’s JPK 1180 Cocody (FRA) victorious in IRC One © Tim Wright/Photoaction.com

IRC One

Richard Fromentin’s JPK 1180 Cocody (FRA) won the class by over four hours from Andrew & Sam Hall’s Lombard 46 Pata Negra (GBR). Last year’s class champion, Dan Litchfield’s Nielsen 59 Hound (USA) was just over an hour behind Pata Negra after IRC time correction.

Cocody was the class winner and second overall for the RORC Transatlantic Race, but the RORC Caribbean 600 was very different as Richard Fromentin explains:

“This was a very technical race, because there were a lot of traps everywhere,” commented Fromentin. “The island wind shadows and the weather conditions made the race very complex, but it was still a very beautiful race and a lot of fun.”

For the first 24 hours of the race Cocody was locked in a battle with two other JPK 1180s; Sunrise powered by Zen (AUS) and Dawn Treader (GBR). “We managed to get ahead of the other two JPK 1180s and the more we got ahead, the more the weather changes went into our advantage. This was the first race for all the team, except for Jean Pierre Dick who knows the course very well and without his expertise it would have been very difficult for us to win. In many ways, this race is similar to our home in Brittany; in coastal races we have to understand the land effects just as here!”

Richard Fromentin’s Team on his JPK 1180 Cocody (FRA) © William Simpson

Third in IRC One – Dan Litchfield’s Nielsen 59 Hound (USA) © Tim Wright/Photoaction.com

Second in IRC One – Andrew & Sam Hall’s Lombard 46 Pata Negra (GBR) © Alex Turnbull

On day five of the RORC Caribbean 600, Friday 23 February, 11 boats were still racing. At 0800 AST nearly all of the boats were east of Antigua reaching towards the Barbuda Mark. After IRC time correction and on the water the class leaders in IRC Two were Peter McWhinnie’s JPK 1080 In Theory (USA) followed by Gavin Howe’s Sun Fast 3600 Tigris (GBR) and Katy Campbell’s Salona 45 Panacea X (CAN).

Satellite Tracking: https://caribbean600.rorc.org/tracking

For more information go to RORC Caribbean 600 website: https://caribbean600.rorc.org/

ENDS/… Louay Habib

Battle Lines Drawn for Class40 Division

Antigua, 22 February 2024: On day four of the RORC Caribbean 600 six of the 11-strong Class40 division were heading towards Redonda, the final island of the 600-mile race. The six-pack of Class40s were in a group just 15 miles apart, but the leading three look to be far enough ahead to make up the podium. However, the wind speed and direction to the finish line in Antigua is very unstable – a thrilling finish is anticipated.

At 0900 AST on Thursday 22 February, James McHugh’s Tquila was rounding Redonda and increasing their lead. LHOROne (FRA) skippered by Guillaume Pirouelle was their nearest rival, as they have been for the entire race. Jules Bonnier’s Entrepreneurs pour la Planète (FRA) is up to third. For the final leg from Redonda to the finish, Tquila, LHOROne and Entrepreneurs pour la Planète are likely to make up the Class40 podium, but in which order is difficult to confirm.

LHOROne (FRA) skippered by Guillaume Pirouelle © Tim Wright/Photoaction.com

Entrepreneurs pour la Planète © Tim Wright/Photoaction.com

The current weather to the west of Antigua is a light southerly breeze. There is plenty of cloud cover which will create areas of wind to increase velocity or to suck the wind out of the sails. The Class40 showdown is expected to be decided before sunset tonight, Thursday 22 February. Please note that all ranking positions above are provisional.

For detailed reporting analysis of the RORC Caribbean 600 fleet head to:

RORC CARIBBEAN 600 SAILRACEHQ

For more information go to RORC Caribbean 600 website: https://caribbean600.rorc.org/

ENDS/… Louay Habib

Leopard 3 Dare to Dream

Farr 100 Leopard 3 (MON) skippered Joost Schuijff took Monohull Line Honours in the 2024 RORC Caribbean 600 in an elapsed time of 02 Days 01 Hrs 23 Mins and 18 Secs.

Leopard 3 Crew: Joost Schuijff, Chris Sherlock, Mitch Booth, Aaron Reynolds-Lovegrove, Antonio Cuervas Mons, Carlos Hernandez Robayna, Charlie Wyatt, Dennis Frederiksen, Gerard Mitchell, Gian Ahluwalia, Giles de Jager, Guillermo Altadill, Mark Bartlett, Matthew Lester, Paul Standbridge, Samuel Wright, Stephen Booth, Tom McWilliam, Will Best.

This is Leopard 3’s ninth RORC Caribbean 600 and while the canting keel Maxi has taken the gun on two previous occasions, Leopard 3 has never won the race overall under IRC for the RORC Caribbean 600 Trophy. Leopard 3 has set the bar on IRC corrected time for all of the 36 boats still racing under IRC and must now wait for the overall winner to be decided. The biggest threat to Leopard for the overall title are all racing in IRC Zero that are about 100 miles from the finish in Antigua.

Leopard 3 at Redonda © Tim Wright/Photoaction.com

“I started racing Leopard some 5-6 years ago,” commented skipper Joost Schuijff. After major changes, including taking 10 tons of weight out of the boat and installing a new mast, we’re seeing the rewards for all that work. However, the most important aspect is the training of the crew; it’s all about the people. The teamwork on Leopard is all important. This is my second RORC Caribbean 600 and with Leopard it can be challenging. This year we saw 30 knot squalls and with big sail area up that can be quite scary, but I really enjoy this race. Sailing in the tropics is picturesque, the scenery is really beautiful and racing against good competition is a perfect combination.”

Leopard 3 led right from the start of the RORC Caribbean 600, opening up a lead of about 30 miles on the nearest competition; Wally 107 Spirit of Malouen X (FRA). However, as Leopard 3 passed through the wind shadow of Guadeloupe the lead almost evaporated as Spirit of Malouen X appeared on the horizon.

Leopard 3 skipper Joost Schuijff © Alex Turnbull

Farr 100 Leopard 3 © Tim Wright/Photoaction.com

Leopard’s Chris Sherlock commented: “We know the boat Spirit of Malouen well as it has won the Maxi Worlds twice. For the ‘600 the TP52 Paprec Sailing Team was racing on board, so we knew that we needed to sail very well to beat them. I have to say I am very pleased that we did the RORC Nelson’s Cup prior to the ‘600 because we were sharp for the big race. In all the years we have raced Leopard we have never had such intense racing practice before and that definitely paid off big time.”

Leopard 3 is now 17 years old and probably faster now than she has ever been. The boat has taken Line Honours and set records all over the world, but apart from the Aegean 600, this would be Leopard’s first big win on IRC corrected time. Neither Skipper Joost Schuijff, nor Chris Sherlock have commented on the possibility of an overall win. However, Leopard has finished the race and the wind is becoming unstable for the boats behind – can Leopard dare to dream?

Chris Sherlock – Leopard 3 © Alex Turnbull

Farr 100 Leopard 3 at the start of the RORC Caribbean 600 © Tim Wright/Photoaction.com

For more information go to RORC Caribbean 600 website: https://caribbean600.rorc.org/

ENDS/… Louay Habib

RORC Caribbean 600 | Argo Wins Multihull Thriller

Antigua, 21 February 2024: Jason Carroll’s MOD70 Argo (USA) has taken Multihull Line Honours in the 2024 Caribbean 600 in an elapsed time of 01 Day 08 Hrs 08 Mins and 40 Secs. Argo Crew: Jason Carroll, Weston Barlow, Chad Corning, Pete Cumming, Sam Goodchild, Chris Maxted, Charlie Ogletree, Brian Thompson.

Erik Maris’ MOD70 Zoulou (FRA) was the second boat to finish the RORC Caribbean 600 and was just 19 minutes behind Zoulou after over 32 hours of intense racing. Alexia Barrier’s MOD70 Limosa – The Famous Project (FRA), co-skippered by Dee Caffari, completed the Multihull Line Honours podium, finishing the race less than four hours behind Argo.

“This year’s race is like any other; it isn’t over until the final beat,” commented Argo’s Jason Carroll. “This year, we may not have had many lead changes, but Zoulou was right behind us at every single turn. Zoulou was forever closing in on us and we had to keep finding ways to protect our position. Honestly, I think Zoulou has shown a big step up in performance since the RORC Transatlantic Race; they were faster than us in a few situations. Limosa – The Famous Project has also shown a big improvement, which is great for them. They were very close with us and Zoulou the entire time; it’s great to see them refining their performance.”

This was the fifth RORC Caribbean 600 for Jason Carroll and the second time MOD70 Argo has taken Multihull Line honours. Argo’s 2022 race record remains intact (01 Day 05 Hrs 48 Mins 45 Secs).

“We love this race, it’s relatively close to home, with beautiful weather, scenery and people!” continued Jason Carroll. “It’s a nice length but still challenging as it’s super-active the entire time, keeping us all busy. It really is an awesome race with reaching conditions and plenty of turns, with new angles to keep you sharp and engaged; the Caribbean 600 is a very thought-provoking and fun race with great competition.”

Jason Carroll’s MOD70 Argo (USA) win the RORC Caribbean 600 Multihull Trophy © Arthur Daniel/RORC

Jason Carroll’s MOD70 Argo (USA)at the start © Tim Wright/Photoaction.com

RORC CEO Jeremy Wilton presents Jason Carroll with the Multihull Line Honours trophy © Arthur Daniel/RORC

Erik Maris’ Zoulou got off to a flyer, port tacking the 11-strong Multihull Fleet: “It was a great start, the plan worked but to be honest we were expecting to duck the fleet, not go over the top of them!” commented Erik Maris. “The race was like a massive game of cat and mouse; we thought we were going to catch Argo three or four times, but every time we caught up, they kept running away from us. We were pushing and pushing right to the end, but to no avail. We will get them next time.”

Erik Maris and crew on MOD70 Zoulou after finishing the race © Arthur Daniel/RORC

Erik Maris/Zoulou congratulates Jason Carroll/Argo (Arthur Daniel/RORC)

Erik Maris/Zoulou congratulates Jason Carroll/Argo (Arthur Daniel/RORC)

The Multihull Line Honours podium is complete with Argo winning the RORC Caribbean 600 Multihull Trophy. The three MOD70s are leading the class after MOCRA time correction. The latest multihull to finish is Fabrice Cahierc’s Ocean Fifty Planet Realities which is currently fourth after time correction. The SailRace HQ Results Programme predicts that just one multihull is on the danger list to topple Argo for the MOCRA crown; the defending MOCRA champion Adrian Keller’s Irens 84 Allegra (SUI). The largest multihull in the race will win the class if Allegra can finish by 14:04:05 AST today 21 February. Allegra is predicted to finish very close to that time, watch this space!

Alexia Barrier’s MOD70 Limosa – The Famous Project (FRA), co-skippered by Dee Caffari, completed the Multihull Line Honours podium © Arthur Daniel/RORC

Teams in the RORC Caribbean 600 are sending in videos, pictures and messages from the race course which are posted on the live blog. The RORC Social Media Channels are also covering many aspects of the race. The RORC Caribbean 600 forms part of the Royal Ocean Racing Club’s Season Points Championships, the world’s largest offshore racing series.

For more information go to RORC Caribbean 600 website: https://caribbean600.rorc.org/

ENDS/… Louay Habib

 

RORC Caribbean 600 | Day Two Report

Antigua, 20 February 2024: By morning (0800 AST) on day two of the RORC Caribbean 600, the vast majority of the fleet was negotiating the northerly extreme of the course, weaving through the chicane of islands; Saba, Sint Maarten, and St. Barths. The leading MOD70s were negotiating the infamous wind shadow of Guadeloupe; Jason Carroll’s Argo (USA) was four miles ahead of Erik Maris’ Zoulou (FRA). The two boats are locked in a battle for line honours, likely to be decided later today, Tuesday 20 February. Alexia Barrier’s MOD70 Limosa – The Famous Project (FRA) was 14 miles behind Argo, less than 30 minutes in MOD70 speed.

Argo’s Chad Corning managed a quick message as they passed out of the wind shadow of Guadeloupe: “All good out here; we managed to survive Guadeloupe and are on our way to the point at Grande Terre. We have had a nice battle with both MOD’s – hoping to stay in front!”

The leading monohull was Farr 100 Leopard 3 (MON) skippered by Joost Schuijff, which was halfway down the long leg from St Barths to Guadeloupe. Prior to the race start, the wind was due to drop on Wednesday 21 February, but the latest forecast shows an improved picture for the smaller, slower boats in the RORC Caribbean 600. The trade winds are still forecast to become unstable, but more wind is now expected.

Farr 100 Leopard 3 © Arthur Daniel

 

Class Analytics 0800 AST 20 February

IRC Overall

Frederic Puzin’s Ker 46 Daguet (FRA) was leading overall under IRC by 32 minutes from Niklas Zennstrom’s Carkeek 52 Rán (SWE). Leopard 3 was 90 minutes behind Daguet. The overall lead has seen many changes since the race start, and it is far too early to predict who will lift the RORC Caribbean 600 Trophy.

IRC Super Zero

Farr 100 Leopard 3 leads the big boat class by six hours after IRC time correction. Marten 72 Aragon (NED) skippered by Nadir Balena was six hours behind Leopard after time correction. Third in IRC Super Zero, nine hours behind Leopard was the Wally 107 Spirit of Malouen X (FRA), skippered by Stephane Nieve and sailed by the Paprec Sailing Team.

IRC Zero

Daguet 3 leads IRC Zero, but that is likely to change as the leading boats are bracing themselves for fast reaching conditions later today. Rán has just passed St Barths and is about to hit the turbo-chargers what looks like a windy power reach south to Guadeloupe. Peter & David Askew’s Botin 52 Wizard (USA) is eight miles behind Rán. Daguet, Wizard, as well as James Neville’s Carkeek 45 Ino Noir (GBR) know that this is a crucial part of the race where Rán maybe at their strongest.

Class40

James McHugh’s Tquila has been the class leader for much of the early part of the race and is hanging on by a few minutes to that lead as the Class40s negotiate the Anguilla Strait. Just three minutes behind is LHOROne (FRA) skippered by Guillaume Pirouelle. Melwin Fink’s Sign for Com (GER) was in third. Tquila is one of the older generation Manuard designs and has been the star performer so far. However, with a long reach to come, the modern scow bows may shake up the leader board.

IRC One

The three JPK 1180s in the race are having an intense battle on the beat to St. Barths, literally matching each other for speed. Richard Fromentin’s Cocody (FRA) has the lowest IRC rating of the three JPK 1180s and leads the class. In the mix with the JPK 1180s after time correction was Frans van Cappelle & Michelle Witsenburg’s J/122 Moana (NED), which is ranked second ahead of Sunrise III powered by Zen (AUS), skippered by Gordon Ketelbey. Ed Bell’s Dawn Treader (GBR) is just off the podium in fourth.

IRC Two

The leader on corrected time in IRC Two is still Peter McWhinnie’s JPK 1080 In Theory (USA). However Gavin Howe’s Sun Fast 3600 Tigris (GBR) is giving In Theory plenty to think about. Tigris is 90 minutes behind after IRC time correction. Just about every boat in IRC Two is beating towards St Barths, and Bernie Evan-Wong’s Lapworth 39 Huey Too (ANT) is revelling in the upwind conditions, challenging the leading boats after IRC time correction.

Teams in the RORC Caribbean 600 are sending in videos, pictures and messages from the race course which are posted on the live blog. The RORC Social Media Channels are also covering many aspects of the race. The RORC Caribbean 600 forms part of the Royal Ocean Racing Club’s Season Points Championships, the world’s largest offshore racing series.

For more information go to RORC Caribbean 600 website: https://caribbean600.rorc.org/

ENDS/… Louay Habib

RORC Caribbean 600 | A Glittering Start

The 15th edition of the RORC Caribbean 600 started in glorious conditions on Monday 19th February off Fort Charlotte Antigua. Sixty-four boats with over 500 sailors from all over the world took to the start for the non-stop 600nm race around 11 Caribbean islands. The south easterly breeze gusting up to 17 knots produced a fast start to the Caribbean classic.

IRC One & IRC Two

The outer distance mark was very busy for the first start with four charter boats giving their guests on board the thrill of winning the pin end: Harmony 52 Sao Jorge (GBR) skippered by Anne Tyler-Morgan and First 40.7 Escapado (GBR) skippered Andy Parritt jostled for position along with Elan 450 Emily of Cowes (GBR) skippered by Richard Laver, and Katy Campbell’s Salona 45 Panacea X (CAN). Andrew & Sam Hall’s Lombard 46 Pata Negra (GBR) got a great start near the pin, as did Gavin Howe’s Sun Fast 3600 Tigris (GBR) all the way inshore.

Approximately five hours into the race, the leader on corrected time in IRC Two is Peter McWhinnie’s JPK 1080 In Theory (USA). The leader for IRC One was Richard Fromentin’s JPK 1180 Cocody (FRA). Joel Aronson’s Hylas 49 Rule One (USA) was over the line but returned to start correctly.

IRC Zero & Class40

The second start was a combination of some of the most technically advanced boats in the race, and the race to the line was just as competitive as the first start. RP42 Rikki (USA) skippered by Bruce Chafee was the closest to the line in the minute before the start. Frederic Puzin’s Ker 46 Daguet (FRA) made a bold move reaching in from an offshore position into a ball of boats but managed to find enough room to get onto Rikki’s tale and then just get the bow down for an electric start. Niklas Zennstrom’s Carkeek 52 Rán (SWE) made a good start inshore of Rikki and Daguet. Peter & David Askew’s Botin 52 Wizard (USA) also got away well. James Neville’s Carkeek 45 Ino Noir (GBR) was over the line, but returned to start correctly. Five hours into the race, leading the IRC Zero Class after time correction was Peter & David Askew’s Wizard.

In the Class40 division, Richard Palmer’s Jangada 40 (GBR) skippered by Rupert Holmes made a clean start inshore. James McHugh’s Tquila and Mathieu Jones’ Alternative Sailing – Constructions du Belon (FRA) also got away to a flyer. Five hours into the race Tquila was the clear leader in the Class40s.

Botin 52 Wizard (USA) & Carkeek 52 Rán © Alex Turnbull

Class40 Start © Tim Wright/RORC

IRC Super Zero

Four Maxis barrelling into the pin at top speed was a breath-taking sight for the IRC Super Zero start. In the mix were Farr 70 Ocean Breeze (AUT) skippered by Johanne Schwartz and VO65 Sisi (AUT) skippered by Gerwin Jansen. Just tucked in behind the pair was Atlas Ocean Racing’s Juan K 70 Il Mostro (CAN). Farr 100 Leopard 3 (MON) skippered by Joost Schuijff and Sergio Giglio’s Southern Wind 102 Egiwave (ITA) were bow level at the start, but Leopard pulled clear and five hours into the race was the leading monohull on the water and after IRC time correction.

IRC Super Zero Start © Tim Wright/RORC

Farr 100 Leopard 3 and Paprec Sailing Team on Spirit of Malouen X © Tim Wright/RORC

MOCRA

The last start featured 11 multihulls, including three MOD70s vying for the race record and Multihull Line Honours. As with all of the previous starts it was rush-hour at the pin end. However, Erik Maris’ MOD70 Zoulou (FRA) started on port, blasting right over the top of the fleet like Zoulou had been shot out of a cannon. Adrian Keller’s Irens 84 Allegra (SUI) got a great start at the pin end. Alexia Barrier’s MOD7 Limosa – The Famous Project (FRA) got away to a fast start, but Jason Carroll’s MOD70 Argo (USA) was late over the line. Guy Chester’s Ocean Tribute (AUS) and Wooldridge & Davis’ Triple Jack (BVI) got a clean start. Five hours into the race, Argo was leading on the water from Limosa – Famous Project, with Zoulou in third. After MOCRA time correction, Fabrice Cahierc’s Ocean Fifty Realites Planet-R (FRA)was leading after five hours of racing.

MOD70 Zoulou (FRA) © Tim Wright/RORC

No Limit and the diverse MOCRA fleet © Arthur Daniel

“It is always great to see the fleet all get away to a clear start,” commented RORC Race Director Steve Cole. “The RORC Race Team will be monitoring the fleet 24-7. All teams in the race will be greeted by the invaluable Caribbean 600 Volunteers with warm smiles and cold Carib beers. We wish all competitors a great race and look forward to seeing them all safely back in Antigua after they have finished.”

Teams in the RORC Caribbean 600 are sending in videos, pictures and messages from the race course which are posted on the live blog. The RORC Social Media Channels are also covering many aspects of the race. The RORC Caribbean 600 forms part of the Royal Ocean Racing Club’s Season Points Championships, the world’s largest offshore racing series. For more information go to RORC Caribbean 600 website. https://caribbean600.rorc.org.

Capturing all the action at the start with Calvin Air © Arthur Daniel/RORC

Fort Charlotte start and spectators © Tim Wright/RORC

Nielsen 59 Hound (USA) © Tim Wright/RORC

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© Caribbean Sailing Association 2018