Magnificent winners at the Royal Southern Yacht Club

By Royal Southern Yacht Club

A light sea breeze provided another day of divine conditions at the Land Union September Regatta with up to three more races for more than 300 sailors of all ages, abilities and nationalities. Racing on the final day of action for the 2019 Royal Southern Summer Series had a special atmosphere with magnificent prizes to be won.

Cobra,GBR 8888N,King 40,Series winners

The overall winner of the 2019 Royal Southern Summer Series was Blair & Beckett’s King 40 Cobra, winning an all inclusive entry for seven people to Antigua Sailing Week 2020. The prize includes return flights from Antigua & Barbuda Tourism, a Dream Yacht Charter bareboat, and free dockage at the UNESCO World Heritage site Nelson’s Dockyard.

Antigua Sailing Week’s Rana Lewis commented, “The Royal Southern has a long history of sailing in Antigua and is a fitting place for us to start this promotion. We are especially happy that it has been won by a young team, who will be coming to Antigua Sailing Week for years to come.”

“We really like racing with the Royal Southern but knowing what was at stake in the final regatta made the racing much more tense,” commented Cobra’s tactician Stevie Beckett one of the core crew of 20 year-olds racing the King 40. “The chance to go to Antigua Sailing Week is pretty rare, only one of the team have been before, and he has told us that it is awesome! It is amazing and I haven’t quite got the words to express our gratitude to the sponsors and the Royal Southern for giving us such a wonderful prize.”

Dream Yacht Charter’s Andy Byham commented: “Providing a bareboat for the promotion was a fantastic way of cementing our relationship with both Antigua Sailing Week and the Royal Southern Yacht Club. Cobra will have a fantastic time at the regatta, they are going to experience the time of their life!”

Pegasus DekMarx,Farr 30

Pegasus DekMarx,Farr 30

Second overall for the Royal Southern Summer Series, and winner of the HP30 Class for the Land Union September Regatta, was Malcolm Wootton’s Farr 30 evo Pegasus DekMarx, winning flights and hotel accommodation for seven people to Berlin courtesy of Land Union.

“We have won the HP30 Class two season’s running and would have won the trip to Antigua if we had more HP30s racing, so let’s get more out next year!” commented Malcolm Wootton. “We bought an abandoned 25 year-old boat, stripped it down, and only put back what we needed to make it faster. We have six keen crew, everybody has proper jobs, everybody is focused and it works. Winning is great but seconds count in the HP30 Class, the most important thing is having fun, as anyone can win any race. Credit to the Royal Southern for getting this level of sponsorship, we have never seen anything like it.”

GR8 Banter

Third overall for the Royal Southern Summer Series, and winner of IRC 3 Class for the Land Union September Regatta, was Handley & James’ Mustang 30 Gr8 Banter, winning hotel accommodation for seven people in Berlin. Ian Handley was enjoying a drink at the Royal Southern with his crew including Piers Nicholls and Zoe James, who have both competed in the 29er Class, and will be going to university at Oxford Brookes and Durham respectively.

“The crew’s collective age is about the same as mine,” smiled Ian Handley. “If it’s a heavy old boat or a 29er it is still about trim and VMG. When I was 14 I raced on the Solent with my mum and dad, we had a wonderful time and improved our results over a number of years, but it was a big journey. I teamed up with Tim James to put our kids and friends on that bigger boat journey. Racing in the Solent with all those variables, it is difficult to get it right, but hugely enjoyable.”

Icy,IC37

For the Land Union September Regatta, Ian Atkins’ IC37 Icy was the winner of IRC 1, Jan van Berne’s J/111 Red Herring was second and Cobra was third. Ian Atkins has been racing at the Royal Southern for many years but the new one-design IC37 Icy was racing in the Summer Series for the first time. “The Royal Southern has superb facilities, ideal for hosting major regattas,” commented Ian Atkins. “The New York Yacht Club has a fleet of 20 IC37, and we envisage the same growth of the class coming from the prestigious clubs that race in the Solent. The class rules only allow one professional sailor and the IC37 is simple in design and easy to maintain, the boat is thrilling to sail.”

Elaine Again,GBR 1250,JPK 1010

Elaine Again,GBR 1250,JPK1010

Winning IRC 2 for the Land Union September Regatta was Mike Bridges’ JPK 10.10 Elaine Again, holding off a strong challenge from Rob & Lucinda McLean’s modified Cork 1720 Spider Pig. Suzie Anthony’s elegant Spirit 46 Dido was third.

In the Club Class Matthew Richardson’s Dehler 44 Ayaya completed a clean sweep winning all four races in Club Class. Claire Dresser’s Sigma 362 Lady Penrose, put in a great performance on the last day, to take second place on countback from David Cule’s Dufour 382 Mint Julep.

Tirio,GBR 1170,J70

In the J/70 Class Lutz Strangemann’s German team racing Tirion was the winner and in Mixed Sportsboat Class it was a special day for Emily Brushett. Her father Adam may have become the 2019 J/70 Corinthian World Champion last week, but 12-year old Emily was at the helm to win at the Land Union September Regatta!

Emily Brushett winner of the Mixed Sportsboat Class

Full Results from the Land Union September Regatta supported by Doyle Sails.

For more information about the Royal Southern Yacht Club
www.royal-southern.co.uk

The prize for the overall winner of the 2019 Royal Southern Yacht Club Summer Series will receive a voucher from Antigua Sailing Week, which generously includes:

  • 7 Return flights to Antigua, funded by Antigua & Barbuda Tourism Authority.
  • Bareboat Dream Yacht Charter.
  • Dockage in UNESCO designated Nelson’s Dockyard.
  • Free entry to the 2020 edition of Antigua Sailing Week, April 25 – May 01, 2019.

 

Bart’s Bash Regatta 2019 – Sint Maarten Yacht Club Fundraiser for the Bahamas Youth Sailors

The Sint Maarten Yacht Club welcomes sailors to sail in the sixth edition of Bart’s Bash!

Bart’s Bash is a global sailing event taking place at hundreds of venues, with thousands of sailors in different classes of boats around the world. Bart’s Bash is one of the Andrew Simpson Foundation’s (ASF) key charitable events. This year, the Sint Maarten Yacht Club would like to make Bart’s Bash all about racing and raising funds for the Bahamas.

All proceeds collected at this year’s Bart’s Bash/St. Maarten will be sent to Lori Lowe, the president of the Bahamas Sailing Association (BSA), with the instructions that the funds raised should go to those youth sailors affected by hurricane Dorian.

From September 27th to October 4th, Nassau will be hosting the 2019 North American Optimist Championships. Three young sailors that will be competing for the Bahamas team are from Abaco. Thankfully they survived Dorian and have now been rescued and are safe in Nassau.

Two weeks after Hurricane Irma hit St. Maarten in 2017, the Sint Maarten Yacht Club was determined that their kids would sail in the Bart’s Bash. They patched up any boats they could and got as many kids that were still around out on the water. It was a success and a greatly needed fun afternoon, as well as fantastic therapy for the kids.

“It is so important that you get kids back to doing as many normal activities as possible after such devastating events. Just having a laugh and doing what they love helps start the healing process. It is vital to try to get as much normality back into their lives to help them deal with all the chaos that they now find themselves in. The Sint Maarten Yacht Club received lots of help after Irma and therefore understands how important it is to get any help possible. Some of the help came from the Andrew Simpson Foundation which is why with the Bart’s Bash coming up, we thought this would be a great way to help,” stated Michele Korteweg, General Manager of the Sint Maarten Yacht Club. “Let’s help keep these kids strong by getting them out sailing again.”

Please sign up to race in Bart’s Bash or sign up to raise funds! There is no fee to enter the event, just register by clicking on the registration button on our website: www.smyc.com/bartsbash or let us know that you want to raise funds: leonde@smyc.com

Contact Reinier Calkhoven for the available boats: youthsailing@smyc.com

Possibilities of fundraising are getting your boat sponsored, baking cookies and selling them during the day, join our Raffle at the prizegiving starting 5:00 or contact us with your own idea. All donations will go towards the youth sailors of the Bahamas.

For more information, The Notice of Race, the Sailing Instructions, Supplementary Sailing Instructions, registration and fundraising: www.smyc.com/bartsbash

A double Play for the St. Maarten Heineken Regatta and the Caribbean multihull Challenge!

The Sint Maarten Yacht Club – organizers of the 40th Annual Heineken Regatta and the 2nd Annual Caribbean Multihull Challenge – in cooperation with repeating sponsor ORIS Swiss Watches – announces a new first for racing in the Northeastern Caribbean. A double play!

Multihulls that register to race in both the Caribbean Multihull Challenge II (14,15,16 February 2020) and in the 40th Heineken Regatta (5,6,7,8 March 2020) will have the opportunity to compete for a Grand Combination Prize of an Oris Swiss Watch worth in excess of $2000.00 US.

Multihulls sailing in both regattas will have their scores combined with the best performer being awarded the new ‘Sint Maartin Yacht Club Heineken Regatta and Caribbean Multihull Challenge Combination Award’ presented at final prize giving on Sunday night 8 March 2020

V.J. Geronimo, CEO-North America, Oris Watches says…”In 2019, along with our retail partners in Sint Maarten, we decided to become official timekeeper and sponsor of both the Caribbean Multihull Challenge and the Heineken; and to work with the yacht club to deepen the association between our precision watches and great sailing. The introduction of this unique two-regatta prize is just another example of how we are activating our commitment to sailing and to the Club.

By the Sint Maarten Yacht Club

CDC RS Feva Class will be designated a Caribbean Championship

The International RS Feva Class Association (IRSFCA) has taken the decision to formally recognise the RS Feva-specific competition of the annual CSA Caribbean Dinghy Championship (CDC)  as a new and dedicated Caribbean Regional RS Feva Championship.

Speaking on this news, International RS Feva Class Association Secretary Lucy Jameson, commented:

“We are very happy to be able to add a specific Caribbean Regional Championship to the growing list of RS Feva events taking place all globally. With strong RS Feva fleets building in so many countries in the Caribbean region we hope that by providing Caribbean sailors with a formally sanctioned RS Feva class event, that the class will go from strength to strength and we look forward to working with the CSA and their member nations to further develop the spread of the RS Feva class in the Caribbean in the months and years to come.”

This exciting development comes as a result of a sustained growth in RS Feva activity in the Caribbean region with a number of venues including the National Sailing Academy in Antigua and the St. Kitts and Nevis Sailing Association having purchased fleets of RS Fevas for their respective sail training programs.

The CDC regatta takes place from Friday, October 18 to Sunday, October 20, 2020 alongside the CSA Annual Conference as part of the newly formatted Caribbean Sailing Week event. With initial entries already received for teams from Antigua and Barbuda, Puerto Rico and St. Maarten, the CDC is set to provide exciting racing for individual sailors as well as stiff competition for the hotly contested CSA Nations Trophy.

Teams from around the Caribbean region are encouraged to enter to race in any or all of the following classes: Laser Radial, Laser, RS Fevas and Optimist, as well as the RS Venture Connect and Hansa 303 Para Classes.

To register for the 2019 Caribbean Dinghy Championship (CDC) regatta click here.

For information on the Caribbean Sailing Association (CSA) and its work in developing sailing in the Caribbean region, visit the website.

Social media links and tags:

Facebook

RS Feva –  https://www.facebook.com/RSFeva/

RS Sailing – https://www.facebook.com/RSsailing/

CSA – https://www.facebook.com/CaribbeanSailingAssociation/

Instagram

RS Feva – https://www.instagram.com/rsfevaofficial/

RS Sailing – https://www.instagram.com/rssailing/

Twitter

RS Sailing – https://twitter.com/RSsailingInt

CSA – https://twitter.com/caribsail

#SailitLiveitLoveit

#RSFeva

#RSSailing

#CaribbeanSailing

#YouthSailing

#Sailing

 

 

Martinique Is Opening Doors

By Ellen Birrell…

Youth2Adult — Y2A — is a series of articles celebrating sailing’s role in youth development for Caribbean children.

Visiting Cercle Nautique de Schoelcher (CNS) in 2015, I’d made the following notes of my impression: “Calm. Patient. Organized. Consummate.”

To watch Martinique’s CNS in action is exhilarating.

In 20 knots of wind with higher blasts, the CNS instructor stands knee deep on the shoreline holding his student’s Optimist stationary with sails in a reach position. The sails flag to port, leaving the student space within the tiny vessel to get her bearings. He calmly explains to her what she’ll do with each tack. She pushes the tiller away from herself. She stands crouching beneath the boom to move her little bottom to the other rail. He continues to hold the Optimist as it crosses the wind. His hand guides her to bring the tiller back into a neutral position. In pelting wind, they calmly repeat, repeat, repeat. He has her do several mock tacks with her back to the bow as well as a few facing the bow. In between tacks, he places his hand amidships and encourages her to shift her weight forward. She responds.

A diverse fleet supports the goal of “sailing for all’

When the instructor lets her loose he jumps aboard, barely fitting in the forward section. Dexterous, he balances as she sheets in and the boat moves forward. He lets his student move at her own pace. She has finally sheeted in enough to have good steerage when a gust lifts the instructor’s brimmed hat airborne. Without flinching, he continues his lesson. She eventually gets the Opti tacked around in the direction of the westward-bound hat, which is quickly making its way toward the open Caribbean Sea. With help from another student, the hat is retrieved and soon passed into the boat holding the instructor.

Despite zooming Windsurfers in their midst and tourists readying on P-Cats ashore, there are no screaming or sand-throwing children. With adequate instruction and plenty of boats, CNS seems nearly devoid of horseplay.

CNS is a good example of a sophisticated community sailing center. The French government has long supported a “sailing for all” approach. This writer has never visited a Caribbean place that better exemplifies this philosophy.

And it seems to work well.

CNS is located on a black sand beach within the town of Schoelcher, only a brief bus ride north of bustling Fort de France. The location, adjacent to a city park with grass and lush decorative palm trees, lets you know that CNS’s success is by design.

The water on this lee side of Martinique is characteristically calm and accommodating to neophyte sailors. Moored and anchored boats within the bay add to a sense of protection from the wide-open Caribbean Sea beyond.

Accommodating sailors from Learn to Sail level all the way up to elite racers, CNS does it all. They also build goodwill within their community and beyond through programs accommodating the physically disabled and visiting tourists. These additional revenue streams keep year-round staffing possible.

A model organization, the grounds are designed for the  storage  of  one-design  boats; a rolling clothing rack holding dozens  of  life  jackets  can  be  rolled  out onto the patio for ease of access by students and then rolled back inside the warehouse-  sized loft. To look inside the CNS “loft” is to get a glimpse of a clean, neatly organized space accommodating stations that meet the needs of sailors: sail and spar storage, sewing machines for sail repair, a large bulletin board displaying schedules  and announcements.

A faucet and sink for freshwater rinsing is designed into the exterior wall of the building. Large trash bins store paddles.

A dozen bare-rigged Prindle cats, rudders upside down, rest in brown sand. Dozens of sailboards, kayaks, and Optimists are stacked four-high on wooden storage mounts. A dozen Laser Picos appear to have been sprayed down and gleam in the midday sun. Many of the large catamarans have canvas covers. Most of the Lasers are stored under the loft roof, and handcarts are abundant to  shuttle boats down the concrete ramp or sandy shore to the water.

The Pico can be crewed by one or two children

One gets a real sense of how well the boats are cared for. CNS continues to lead with yet another innovation: “Open Doors”, an event for disadvantaged Martinique youth that was held late last year. According to Oliver Rene-Corail, President of Club Nautique de Schoelcher and President of the Sailing League of Martinique, “We organized this special Open Doors at Club Nautique de Schoelcher.” Although he was unavailable for further comment as this issue of Compass goes to press, maybe more of us can visit Club Nautique de Schoelcher and check out the scene first hand!

CNS is located on a black sand beach within the town of Schoelcher, only a brief bus ride north of bustling Fort de France

Ellen Birrell attributes her opportunity to cruise the Caribbean aboard S/V Boldly Go to life skills built in childhood in coastal southern California. Believing swimming and sailing along with reading, writing, arithmetic, music and art are essentials for island youth, she supports youth development through writing and networking.

This article first appeared in the Caribbean Compass. See caribbeancompass.com

 

Carlos Aguilar Event Matches Foreign Competitors with Local Youth

By Ellen Birrell…

Youth2Adult — Y2A — is a series of articles celebrating sailing’s role in youth development for Caribbean children.

“I felt proud as I watched our Marine Vocational Program students climb comfortably aboard the boats and immediately become racing team members — their ease       to integrate showed me that they have become real boaters,” says CEO of the Marine Vocational Program (MVP) in St. Thomas, Jimmy Loveland. Collaborating with the Boys and Girls Club of St. Thomas and the Carlos Aguilar Match Race (CAMR)  regatta organizers, they advance sailing development and marine vocational training with St. Thomas and St. John disadvantaged youth. Occurring each fall for the last ten years in St. Thomas, the two-day, high-level match race event has evolved to include hands-on experiences for local youth. As part of the overall event, the one- day CAMR Youth Regatta 2018 saw local girls, boys and young adults sailing with visiting yachtswomen from France, Great Britain, the Netherlands, Sweden and the USA who were competing in the Women’s International Match Racing Series hosted by the Carlos Aguilar Match Race.

Members of the Boys and Girl Club of St. Thomas had the opportunity to sail with world-class racers

Vocational Program (MVP) in St. Thomas, Jimmy Loveland. Collaborating with the Boys and Girls Club of St. Thomas and the Carlos Aguilar Match Race (CAMR)  regatta organizers, they advance sailing development and marine vocational training with St. Thomas and St. John disadvantaged youth. Occurring each fall for the last ten years in St. Thomas, the two-day, high-level match race event has evolved to include hands-on experiences for local youth. As part of the overall event, the one- day CAMR Youth Regatta 2018 saw local girls, boys and young adults sailing with visiting yachtswomen from France, Great Britain, the Netherlands, Sweden and the USA who were competing in the Women’s International Match Racing Series hosted by the Carlos Aguilar Match Race.

Match racing is sailed in two identical boats around a short course, providing fast action close to the crowds on shore. The intense racing is just as exciting for the spectators as it is strategically, tactically and physically challenging for the competing crews, and the CAMR courses, right off the Charlotte Amalie waterfront, provide excellent viewing.

Team ISV for a day — maybe more

 

“Students of the Marine Vocational Program and members of the Boys & Girls Club St. Thomas/St. John have learned that sailing a boat calls for quick action, a blend of feeling the wind and water as well as with the very heart and soul of the boat itself. Sailing has taught our students alertness and courage, and gives back a joyousness and peace that other sports cannot offer. They raise the sails with strong hands and go after the opportunities that arise in life at sea. They are not a drop in the ocean but are the ocean in a drop.”

— Jacqueline Brown, Director of the Boys & Girls Club St. Thomas/St. John

History of Carlos Aguilar Match Race

From carlosaguilarmatchrace.com: While the memory of Carlos Aguilar is embedded in the hearts of family and friends, it will forever be inscribed on the Caribbean Sea. It is there that his mentoring is played out again and again by the young sailors he counseled and loved. Since his death in October 2007, they continue to sail them- selves to new heights and undoubtedly will pass down his nautical wisdom to their own children one day.

For Carlos, there could be no better tribute. Sailing was in his blood. As a young boy growing up in El Salvador, he spent many a weekend sailing on a nearby     lake. His competitive spirit came from his father, who sailed for El Salvador in the 1968 Olympics.

Carlos found himself in the Virgin Islands after graduating from college in Kansas with a degree in architecture. He answered an ad from an architectural firm on St. Thomas, and decades later, the island remained his home.

Friends appreciated his generosity and attention, often expressed through his talents as someone unusually clever with his hands and gifted with keen instincts. Bill Canfield will never forget Carlos pushing aside Bill’s efforts to remodel his home, changing the dwelling into one that truly made sense for a person of limited mobility. Just days after Carlos died, Beth and Bruce Marshall moved into the home he had designed for them, finding carefully placed notes on exactly how they should use their space.

To many, Carlos was a quiet presence — an enigma — dignified, handsome in his polo and khakis, always willing to return a smile, respond hello but never one to insinuate himself or spend his conversation on casual  acquaintances. He stayed in the background. Except when it came to young people. He had a natural gift that endeared them to him. He was salty, and he challenged them. But he was kind, and always ready to have fun.

This regatta is a tribute to the type of sailing that Carlos most loved, and to the   spirit and loyalty he engendered in those he touched. Here’s to sailing, and to his mantra that friends and loved ones regarded as his signature wisdom: “Let it go.”

The CAMR is a World Sailing (WS)-provisional Grade One event. The format features a full round robin of all teams followed by knockout quarterfinals for the top eight, then knockout semi-finals, petit-finals and finals. The event is sailed in the IC24, a modification of the J/24.

The CAMR is known internationally for introducing young sailors to the sport, working cooperatively with the US Virgin Islands’ government and USVI Department  of Tourism in its efforts to get more of the islands’ youth out on the water. As such,    the event hosts the CAMR Youth Regatta each year.

Carol Bareuther reported: “The 2018 Women’s International Match Racing Series finale was held during the Carlos Aguilar Match Race in St. Thomas, USVI, from November 29th through December 2nd. Twelve teams from France, Great Britain, the Netherlands, Sweden and the USA participated. The WIM Series is the first and only professional sailing  series  for women, hosted by the Women’s International Match Racing Association (WIMRA) and joined by the world’s leading women match racing sailors.”

The Future

Bill Canfield, President of Virgin Islands Sailing Association: “The VI Sailing Association is extremely proud of the accomplishments of our junior sailors over the past two decades. We are now working hard to get more of the islands’ youth to feel part of our events and get out on the water. As an island nation, we are behind some of our neighbors in this effort but feel it is an important part of our ongoing function to push each and every regatta to introduce a few new young faces to an on-the-water experience. It is our feeling that introducing our natural water environment to more and more local islanders may change their lives for the better. The Carlos Aguilar Match Race is proud to be part of that effort.’

However, Canfield notes, “There is a core group of five or six of us that have been carrying the event since Day One. As a group, we decided to go out on top. It was a wonderful event for ten years.” He stated that the event’s organizers have come to an impasse related to obtaining the annual sponsorship required to run the event. No 2019 CAMR is scheduled.

Call to action: Is there any individual or organization poised to financially keep CAMR afloat?

Visit carlosaguilarmatchrace.com for more information on CAMR.

Visit bgcusvi.org for more information on the Boys and Girls Club of St. Thomas.

 

Ellen Birrell attributes her opportunity to cruise the Caribbean aboard S/V Boldly Go  to life skills built in childhood in coastal southern California. Believing swimming and sailing, along with reading, writing, arithmetic, music and art, are essentials for island youth, she supports youth development through writing and networking. Reach her at ellenbirrell@gmail.com

This article first appeared in the Caribbean Compass. See caribbeancompass.com

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© Caribbean Sailing Association 2018